Films & Videos of the Museum für Vor- und Frühgeschichte

Alone in the museum

Allein im Museum | Museum für Vor- und Frühgeschichte mit Matthias Wemhoff

Matthias Wemhoff, Direktor des Museums für Vor- und Frühgeschichte im Neuen Museum, nimmt uns in diesem Video mit auf eine Entdeckungstour durch die Ur- und Frühgeschichte in Berlin-Brandenburg. Angefangen vom Höhlenlöwen der Altsteinzeit vom Berliner Alexanderplatz bis hin zu den goldenen Stiefelsporen aus dem mittelalterlichen Burgwall von Spandau, die eine ganz eigene Geschichte erzählen.

Länge: 11:04 Minuten

3 Perspectives on 1 Piece

In our series 3 and More Perspectives on a Piece, we elucidate selected works from very different points of view.

3 Perspectives on 1 Piece | Der Berliner Goldhut | Part 1

Length: 1:07 minutes

3 Perspectives on 1 Piece | Der Berliner Goldhut | Part 2

Length: 1:59 minutes

3 Perspectives on 1 Piece | Der Berliner Goldhut | Part 3

Length: 1:13 minutes

3 Perspectives on 1 Piece | Der Berliner Goldhut | Part 4

Length: 2:39 minutes

3 Perspectives on 1 Piece | Der Elch vom Hansaplatz | Part 1

Length: 1:52 minutes

3 Perspectives on 1 Piece | Der Elch vom Hansaplatz | Part 1

Length: 1:51 minutes


Exhibitions

Sardinia – Island of Megaliths

The Museum für Vor- und Frühgeschichte at the Neues Museum is the first European stop for a major exhibition that focuses on the culture of Sardinia’s ancient megaliths, in particular those of the Nuragic culture. 

Sardinia – Island of Megaliths | The Neolithic and Bronze Age burial structures

Length: 8:07 Minutes

Sardinia | The Nuraghic Heritage of Sardinia

Length: 5:28 Minutes

Sardinia | Nuraghi and Metal Trade in the Bronze Age

Length: 5:33 Minutes

Sardinia | The cult and pilgrimage sites of the Bronze and Iron Ages

Length: 5:21 Minutes

Sardinia | The giant statues from Mont'e Prama from the Iron Age

Length: 5:13 Minutes

The Germanic Tribes. Archaeological Perspectives

For the first time, the Germanic tribes will be the focus of a large-scale archaeological exhibition. In collaboration with the LVR-Landesmuseum Bonn, the Museum für Vor- und Frühgeschichte is showing the special exhibition The Germanic Tribes: Archaeological Perspectives on Berlin’s Museumsinsel. The Neues Museum will present the shifting history of research into the Germanic tribes and its reception, while in the James-Simon-Galerie – which is reopening its doors to host the exhibition – more than 700 exhibits will be on display, including numerous new finds and outstanding loans from across Germany, Denmark, Poland and Romania.

The mythical frieze in the Neues Museum

Length: 19:40 minutes
Music: Fornnordiska Klanger. Recherchiert und produziert von Casja S. Lund

The Germanic Tribes. Archaeological Perspectives

Length: 0:45 Minutes
Concept: polyform / studio edgar kandratian
Installation and grading: Willan Octave-Emile
Music: Fornnordiska Klanger. Recherchiert und produziert von Casja S. Lund

Germanen. Eine archäologische Bestandsaufnahme | Expert interviews

In dialogue with:

  • Prof. Dr. Michael Meyer, Freie Universität Berlin
  • Prof. Dr. Heiko Steuer, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
  • Dr. Babette Ludowici, Braunschweigische Landesmuseen
  • Prof. Dr. Hans-Jörg Karlsen, Universität Rostock

Length: 25:32 Minutes
Production: Staatliche Museen zu Berlin / Christof Hannemann

Curator Susanne Kuprella’s Favourite Object

What are the exhibition highlights in the eyes of our curators? Our special exhibition curator Susanne Kuprella gets the series off and running by presenting her own personal highlight.

Sometimes, the most inconspicuous objects can conceal the most remarkable stories. The perfect example of this is provided by two wooden idols from the Thuringian sacrificial bog of Oberdorla. If your first thought when it comes to Germanic gods is the hammer-wielding Thor or the omniscient Odin, father of the gods, you’ll probably be sorely disappointed…     

Length: 3:09 minutes  
Photo: Two anthropomorphic wooden idols from the sacrificial bog of Oberdorla, Vogtei, Unstrut-Hainich-Kreis district. Height: 124 cm and 150 cm. © Thuringian State Office for the Preservation of Historical Monuments – Thuringian Museum of Pre- and Ancient History/Hauke Arnold music during credits: Fornnordiska Klanger. Research and production by Casja S. Lund

 

Curator Heino Neumayer’s Favourite Object

Next up in our favourite objects series is not so much an object as an entire project. Curator Dr Heino Neumayer’s highlight is a graphic reconstruction of the abandoned Germanic settlement of Klein Köris, some 30 km south of Berlin. While the region of contemporary Brandenburg with its plentiful rivers and lakes was a popular area for human settlement between the 1st and 3rd century, in the 4th century, things changed dramatically.

The region was virtually deserted and came to resemble a wasteland. The former settlements were left as they were, and the communities likely moved to the south-west, to what today is Baden-Württemberg. The Migration Period began, completely recasting the maps of Europe. For archaeologists, however, the subterranean remains of such deserted settlements are a veritable treasure trove. The traces they harbour allow us to reconstruct entire villages and, as in the case of today’s open-air museum Germanische Siedlung Klein Köris e.V., to truly bring them back to life.

Length: 2:33 minutes
Photo: Reconstruction of daily life in the abandoned settlement of Klein Köris from the 4th century AD based on archaeological findings. © Mikko Kriek, 2020

Dr. Benjamin Wehry’s Favourite Object

The shield buckle from the princely tomb at Gommern

Length: 6:12 minutes
Opening and closing credits: Fornnordiska Klanger. Recherchiert und produziert von Casja S. Lund

War among the Germanic tribes

Length: 13:40 minutes
Music: Fornnordiska Klanger. Recherchiert und produziert von Casja S. Lund

Trade with the Germanic Tribes

The Roman historian Tacitus said that there was nothing worthwhile in Germania. But what exactly did the Germanic tribes trade in and what appealed to Roman interests?

Our academic trainee at the Museum für Vor und Frühgeschichte (Museum of Prehistory and Early History), Sebastian Olschok, shows you in this video using examples from our Germanic exhibition.

Length: 5:28 minutes
Music: Fornnordiska Klanger. Recherchiert und produziert von Casja S. Lund

Cult & Religion Among the Germanic Tribes

Odin, Thor, Loki and the entire pantheon of the gods: Who doesn’t know them all? But were they really the gods of the Germanic peoples from the 1st to the 4th century AD, the period in which we speak of Germanic peoples? Or is this perhaps a romanticised association with the Old Norse pantheon, which was first handed down to us in the 12th century , i.e. the Middle Ages? What can we actually grasp from the cultic and religious beliefs of the Germanic societies and what did they look like?

In our new video, Sebastian Olschok separates myths from verifiable facts. Roll the film!

Length: 9:29 minutes
Music: Old Fashioned Parlour Piano. Domansed; Ritt der Walküren. Richard Wagner
Opening and closing credits: Fornnordiska Klanger. Recherchiert und produziert von Casja S. Lund

Germanenbilder

Germanenbilder | The sword

Length: 8:07 minutes
Video: Kaptorga - Visual History

Germanenbilder | The Germanic term

Length: 6:06 minutes
Video: Kaptorga - Visual History

Germanenbilder | Building history

Length: 9:22 minutes
Video: Kaptorga - Visual History

Germanenbilder | Swastikas

Length: 6:44 minutes
Video: Kaptorga - Visual History

Germanenbilder | Trade

Length: 5:43 minutes
Video: Kaptorga - Visual History

Germanenbilder | Moor findings

Length: 5:43 minutes
Video: Kaptorga - Visual History

Germanenbilder | Religion

Length: 6:49 minutes
Video: Kaptorga - Visual History

Germanenbilder | Drinking like the barbarians

Length: 5:45 minutes
Video: Kaptorga - Visual History

Margiana | Trailer

Margiana – around 4,000 years ago, this historic landscape in eastern Turkmenistan was the cradle of a fascinating and sophisticated Bronze Age culture. Contemporary with the civilisations of Mesopotamia and Egypt, it has nevertheless remained relatively unknown in the West. Now for the first time outside Turkmenistan, a major exhibition at Berlins Neues Museum will make the archaeological remains of this mysterious culture accessible to a wide public.

Length: 0:26 minutes
Photographs: Herlinde Koelbl
Production: Retina Fabrik